It has been quite a long time since we last posted a roundup of great content on software testing from around the web.

  • Mistakes We Make in Testing by Michael Sowers - "Not being involved in development at the beginning and reviewing and providing feedback on the artifacts, such as user stories, requirements, and so forth. Not collaborating and developing a positive relationship with the development team members..."
  • Changing the conversation about change in testing by Katrina Clokie - "I'm planning to stop talking about bugs, time and money. Instead I'm going to start framing my reasoning in terms of corporate image, increasing quality awareness among all disciplines, and improving end-user satisfaction."
  • How to Pack More Coverage Into Fewer Software Tests by Justin Hunter - "There are simply too many interactions for a tester to keep track of on their own. As a result, manually-selected test sets almost always fail to test for a rather large number of potentially important interactions."
  • Building Quality by Alan Page - "your best shot at creating a product that customers like crave is to get quantitative and qualitative feedback directly from your users... Get it in their hands, listen to them, and make it better."
  • Dr. StrangeCareer or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Software Testing Industry by Keith Klain - "Testing is hard. Doing it right is very hard. An ambiguous, unchartered journey into a sea of bias and experimentation, but as the line from the movie goes, 'the hard is what makes it great'."
  • Exploratory Testing 3.0 by James Bach and Michael Bolton - "Because we now define all testing as exploratory. Our definition of testing is now this: 'Testing is the process of evaluating a product by learning about it through exploration and experimentation, which includes: questioning, study, modeling, observation and inference, output checking, etc.'"
  • Coverage Is Not Strongly Correlated With Test Suite Effectiveness by Laura Inozemtseva and Reid Holmes - "Our results suggest that coverage, while useful for identifying under-tested parts of a program, should not be used as a quality target because it is not a good indicator of test suite effectiveness. "
  • How Software Testers Can Teach, Share and Play with Others by Justin Rohrman - Software testers "bring a varied skill set to software development organizations — math, experiment design, modeling, and critical thinking."
  • Who Killed My Battery: Analyzing Mobile Browser Energy Consumption - " dynamic Javascript requests can greatly increase the cost of rendering the page... by modifying scripts on the Wikipedia mobile site we reduced by 30% the energy needed to download and render Wikipedia pages with no change to the user experience."

By: John Hunter on Apr 27, 2016

Categories: Roundup, Software Testing